Birds from my balcony

Come winter, the mango-tree in the old, crumbling house behind our apartment building becomes a very interesting place. White-browed Fantails, Brown Flycatchers, Orioles and on one occasion, an Indian Pitta, turn up either for season-long stays or just for one evening.

Other birds regularly seen on the tree include Purple-rumped Sunbirds, Great Tits, Pale-billed Flowerpeckers, Common Tailorbirds, Red-vented Bulbuls, Coppersmith and White-cheeked Barbets, Rose-ringed Parakeets, White-breasted Kingfishers, Brahminy Kites, Black Drongos, Common Koels, Jungle and Common Crows and Common Mynas. There are surely more, but these are the ones I can recall off the top of my head.

I haven’t made more than a couple of very lazy attempts to photograph the birds. But here are two pictures, both taken about two months ago. The yellow one is the Black-naped Oriole and the other is the Brahminy Kite.

Black-naped Oriole
Brahminy Kite

Advertisements

4 responses to “Birds from my balcony

  1. Lovely pictures. Wish I wasn’t in the winter climes of the northern hemisphere. I’d put that nice 300mm lens to good use.

    Thank you! I’m sure there are plenty of birds there for you to photograph. Sometimes the starkness of the surroundings makes the pictures look even better.

  2. Wow!! Lovely pictures and lucky you!

  3. Of course. The Montezuma reserve near where I live is an excellent spot for bird photography in the summer, but rarely gets birds during the winter, as they migrate to warmer parts. As you say, there are several interesting species here.

  4. Pingback: About a tree « ragamalika

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s